Read. Write. Go.

Napoleons Places of Exile

Natasha Cribbs

Mr. Franklin

Western Civilization Since 1700

3 March 2014

Napoleons Places of Exile

            Napoleon was known for his leadership and place in history. Even though he was such an intense leader, conqueror, and power hungry, it did not stop him from getting caught and exiled. During his time, Napoleon was captured and banished twice. Two of the places he was sent to was Elba island and Saint Helena Island.

Elba is an island in the Mediterranean, off of the central Italy coast. It is now a fairly peaceful island with mild climate. The wildlife thrives and has variety. People may stay in hotels and such on the island. It is interesting that Napoleon was once banished to that same island.

Napoleons first exile was after he launched an invasion on Russia when he thought that Russia and England were about to start an alliance. Napoleons forces did not win, however. Any offers he gave were not accepted, and he was banished to Elba. However, it is obvious he did not stay there in the quote, “In March 1815, he escaped his island exile and returned to Paris, where he regained supporters and reclaimed his emperor title, Napoleon I, in a period known as the Hundred Days,”(Napoleon Exiled to Elba).

Napoleon then continued on his plans and went through more battles. The next important battle that deals with his places of banishment is the Battle of Waterloo. The Battle of Waterloo was his final defeat. After the battle, he was sent to Saint Helena island.

Like Elba, Saint Helena island is now an attraction for people. It is fair, nice, and has an ample amount of things like history, climate, shrimp docks, and more. Unlike Elba, it is off of the coast of Africa.

For the rest of his life, about six years, Napoleon stayed at Saint Helena. It was also the place of his death, which many people believe was “most likely of stomach cancer,”(Napoleon Dies in Exile).

Work Cited

“Napoleon Exiled to Elba.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014.

“Napoleon Dies in Exile.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2014.

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: